Playing by the rules; responsible pet ownership is a game changer

Responsible pet ownership is the name of the game when purchasing a new pet (or even a plant), and invasive species are the bad guys. Habitat, food and lifestyle are essential to know, but now you need to make sure your new pet isn’t trying to cheat the game by disguising themselves as an invasive species. Thankfully, the aquatic invasive species (AIS) team are no newbies when it comes to playing this game!

Just last December, a Fort McMurray woman purchased a pair of incorrectly identified turtles advertised on social media in Gibbons. After she brought home what she thought were four-month-old Sawback turtles, it was discovered that they were actually map turtles (Genus Graptemys), an invasive species in Alberta. This species is listed in the Wildlife Regulation as well as the Communicable Diseases Regulation (Alberta Health Ministry) as they can carry salmonella bacteria which can result in fever or diarrhea, sometimes even death to humans. It is illegal to buy, sell or own map turtles in Alberta.

Map Turtle

Its not just misidentification of species that can cause issues for single players in this game, sometimes stores receive the wrong species to sell! This summer, the AIS team discovered two prohibited species under the Fisheries (Alberta) Act – Fanwort and Oriental Weather Loach – being sold at a large pet store chain. The Oriental Weather Loach was for sale under its alternate name Dojo Loach, and the Fanwort was listed as a Green Cabomba plant. If you’ve purchased either of these two species, call the AIS Hotline at 1-855-336-BOAT (2628).

Whether you’re on the winning streak of pet ownership or just learning the rules, it’s important to be the game changer in this world full of players!

Hot gaming tips:

  1. Don’t be a noob! Before buying an aquatic pet, plant or invertebrate, doing a quick google search for the scientific name of the species can help you understand if the species is prohibited. A great place to start is Alberta’s prohibited species list.
  2. When it’s game over, take appropriate measures to protect the environment.
    • If you don’t want your pet anymore… Don’t let it loose! Many aquarium plants, fish and pets we purchase are not native to our ecosystem and if released, can cause harm to the environment. Donate your unwanted pet to a friend or return it to the pet store.
    • When the sad day comes that your pet dies, instead of flushing it down the toilet, consider burying it or throwing it in the garbage. Fish can carry foreign diseases and parasites that could spread through our water systems and affect native species.
  3. Level up and become a game master! Report aquatic invasive species to the aquatic invasive species hotline at 1-855-336-BOAT (2628). Find out more about aquatic invasive species.

Fill out Fisheries and Oceans Canada survey on aquariums to help them gain a better understanding of the use and movement of aquatic plants and animals associated with the aquarium trade in Canada.

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