About AB Enviro & Parks

Public servants working with Albertans to protect our environment.

Water’ll we do without it? Finding Nature-Based Solutions to Protect Alberta’s Water Resources

Water has been boiling to the top of people’s mind as the world is faced with more and more water-related issues like flood, drought and water pollution. In Alberta, we continue to find ways to protect our water resources. As World Water Day approaches on March 22, the day’s theme, Nature for Water, couldn’t be more fitting. Finding nature-based solutions to help solve our 21st century world water problems is the key to preserving this resource.

Water blog

Continue reading

This is the infestation that never ends…

 …Yes it goes on and on my friends.

The thing with invasive species is that once they’re introduced to a habitat in which they are not native, they’re extremely difficult to eradicate, especially if that population has been there for a while AND it’s in the water.

The flowering rush, Butomus umbellatus, is one such species.

Flowering rush

Continue reading

Popular energy efficiency program expanded to help food services sector

Energy efficiency programs are one way we are working to make life better for Alberta businesses and organizations, saving them money and energy. Businesses, non-profits and institutions are getting more support with the expansion of an already popular energy efficiency rebate program.

2

Continue reading

Resilient Residents – Frosty Fish

This is the last of a four part series on our province’s most resilient animals. You can find out more about mammals that are active through the winter here, about mammals that are inactive but don’t hibernate here, or about birds that stay in the province over the winter here.

While mammals may burrow or hibernate, and birds can be seen shivering away on a branch, the average Albertan never sees what happens to fish during the frigid days of winter.

Ice_Fishing

Continue reading

Women in Science – Part of the Sis-STEM – Dr. Cynthia McClain

In honour of International Day for Women and Girls in Science on February 11, our Chief Scientist Dr. Fred Wrona invited women from across the department to talk about their work and share their experiences as scientists. This is the third and final interview celebrating the fabulous females in this field – for now!

Dr. Cynthia McClain is a hydrogeologist with the Alberta Environment and Parks.

Cynthia3 Continue reading

Women in Science – Part of the Sis-STEM – Shoma Tanzeeba

In honour of International Day for Women and Girls in Science on February 11, our Chief Scientist Dr. Fred Wrona invited women from across the department to talk about their work and share their experiences as scientists. This is the second of three interviews celebrating the fabulous females in this field.

Shoma Tanzeeba is a hydrologist working in Alberta’s South Saskatchewan Region.Shoma5
Continue reading

Women in Science – Part of the Sis-STEM – Tanya Rushcall

Bright and passionate individuals in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields are working to answer society’s most difficult questions and find solutions to our biggest challenges. The innovation, creativity and competitive advantage that comes with having a diverse workforce is more important than ever, yet women remain underrepresented in STEM.

In honour of International Day for Women and Girls in Science on February 11, our Chief Scientist Dr. Fred Wrona invited women from across the department to talk about their work and share their experiences as scientists. This is the first of three interviews celebrating the fabulous females in this field.

Meet Tanya Rushcall! An aquatic invasive species biologist with Alberta Environment and Parks.Tanya1 Continue reading

Alberta’s Approach to Caribou Recovery

Alberta is home to abundant wild species, rich biodiversity and immense ecological heritage. This is something we sometimes take for granted.

Mountain/woodland caribou bullIn the past few decades a few things have become apparent when it comes to the environment. We need to make sure we are balancing activities on our landscapes, we need to have plans in place to lay the foundations of work to conserve and protect, and we need to work together to achieve the best possible outcomes for our wild species.

An example of this is the work being done to protect Canada’s woodland caribou. In Alberta, caribou ranges cover about 23 per cent of the landscape, with 15 ranges falling under provincial jurisdiction. All woodland caribou in the province are designated as Threatened under both the federal Species at Risk Act and provincial Wildlife Act.

Continue reading

Resilient Residents – Winter Birds

This is the third of a four part series on our province’s most resilient animals. You can find out more about mammals that are active through the winter here or about mammals that are inactive but don’t hibernate here.

black-capped chickadee

So far this winter, mammals have been all the talk, but we can’t forget about the other animals that brave the Alberta winter experience – like birds. If birds can fly south why wouldn’t they? We know that mammals are considerably less mobile and don’t have the option to fly south for the winter, but most birds could get some distance between themselves and the snow. Continue reading

Resilient Residents – Mammals that are inactive but don’t hibernate

shutterstock_16664695BeaverThis is the second of a four part series on our province’s most resilient animals. You can find out more about mammals that are active through the winter here.

You may have assumed that the mammals you don’t see during the winter are hibernating, but that isn’t always the case. In fact, some mammals use an ‘in between’ strategy that involves a lot of deep sleeping with some activity to pass the time in colder weather. Continue reading