Join the 30-day challenge to MOVE with the air in mind

We all have to move to get to work and wherever we recreate. Why not move in ways that improve health, promote safety, save money and maintain air quality?

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Starting June 7, Albertans are encouraged to move with the air in mind once a day for 30 days. It could be as simple as walking to the library and borrowing a book on air or reducing idling time by parking and going inside instead of using a drive-thru. When these daily activities become habits and lots of people do them, everyone benefits. You can move on your own or with your family, coworkers, friends or teammates on your way to work, play, home or on a road trip.

Move yourself using human-powered transportation.
Move smart using fuel efficient practices when driving.

Check back daily or follow us on Twitter. We will be adding challenges each day for the next 30 days!


June 25 – Challenge #19

Move with the air in mind!

Bike to a park and have a picnic.
http://ow.ly/AdZE30cQ5Z3


June 24 – Challenge #18

Mend your fuelish ways – avoid carrying unnecessary weight!

Remove unnecessary weight from your vehicle. The less weight in your vehicle, the less fuel your engine will need.
http://www.nrcan.gc.ca/energy/efficiency/transportation/cars-light-trucks/driving/7521


June 23 – Challenge #17

Mend your fuelish ways – maintain a steady speed!

Be consistent with your speed. Consider using cruise control for highway driving. Where traffic patterns permit, allow your speed to drop when you travel uphill, then regain your momentum as you roll downhill.
http://www.nrcan.gc.ca/energy/efficiency/transportation/cars-light-trucks/fuel-efficient-driving-techniques/7507

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Celebrate our vast, complex, interconnected, beautiful environment

For the past 45 years, Canadians have marked the week of June 5 as Environment Week and taken the opportunity to talk about being green – but why do we do it?

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Our environment isn’t just the air we breathe and the water we drink, it’s the plankton that provide oxygen, it’s the bats that reduce pest species, and it’s the worms that make the soil more fertile. It’s a complex web of relationships between all the life with which we share the planet.

It’s sometimes hard to see the forest for the trees.

Because the environment is so vast and complex, every action we take can’t help but to affect the environment in some way, large or small. Every road we build separates one ecological niche from the next, every tree we plant might cast shade over a patch of grass, and every boat we paddle sends ripples across the lake.

Environment Week is an opportunity to think about the consequences of what we do, and to make good environmental choices.

If you’re wondering about how you can reduce your impact on the environment by conserving energy, visit www.efficiencyalberta.ca – you can even save money through rebate programs.

If you’re considering how you can reduce your water usage, visit http://aep.alberta.ca/water for information and for tips.

If you want to try composting at home to reduce the amount of household waste material that ends up in the landfill, we have information about that at http://aep.alberta.ca/waste/composting-at-home

All this week on our social media (AEP Twitter, and on Facebook at Respect The Land, My Wild Alberta and Alberta Parks), we’ll be posting environment-inspired materials. So follow us for fun facts, information and more as we celebrate our environment and celebrate making better choices for everyone!

Making our brownfields green

Picture4Some problems we think are buried don’t stay buried; in fact they can grow over time if not addressed.

This is sometimes the case when industry does not properly address harmful substances underground and the substance spreads into the soil and groundwater in the area. Over time, sites like this can become apparent when vegetation does not grow; these areas are called brownfields. Continue reading

Attack of the Killer Goldfish!

Okay, well goldfish may not kill you, but they can certainly kill our ecosystems if they are let loose in Alberta’s waters! Goldfish are showing up all over the province – and not just in pet stores or your aquarium at home.

Infestations have been found in storm water ponds at alarming rates over the last few years. How did they get there? People have been releasing their unwanted pets into the neighbourhood ponds behind their homes thinking this is more humane than other alternatives. Continue reading

Alberta’s watersheds – going right to the source

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Albertans don’t always think about the water they drink, play in and rely on every day – it is often taken for granted. So where does that clean water that flows out of the tap when you turn it on come from? It depends entirely on where you live in the province! Continue reading

Pining for recovery

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Ancient limber pine tree

When most people think about species at risk in Alberta, wildlife like bull trout, caribou, or burrowing owls probably come to mind. What people usually forget is that Alberta has many plant species at risk too – mostly in the prairies. Alberta has two endangered tree species: whitebark pine and limber pine. Both of these species grow in the Rocky Mountains and limber pine also grows in the adjacent foothills, so working with these endangered species always involves spectacular scenery, starring these gnarled spreading trees, and hiking or helicopter access. Continue reading

An old meaning to live streaming

 

Riparian…say whaaat?

It may sound like some kind of prehistoric creature, but riparian refers to the strips of green vegetation alongside streams, creeks, rivers, lakes, sloughs and other bodies of water. Riparian areas are found across Alberta: in northern boreal forest, parkland, foothills, mountains and prairie grasslands. Although riparian areas make up a small percentage of the landscape, they are definitely a big deal. Riparian areas have far reaching benefits to water, land, livestock, wildlife and humans.

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Household hazardous waste – think before it hits the sink

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Have you come close to throwing something out and wondered, “Can I just toss this in the trash?” Not everything can safely go into household trash – items like leftover cleaners, motor oil, light bulbs and aerosol cans are likely household hazardous waste (HHW) and require special disposal. Continue reading

Western Canada unites to prevent aquatic invasion

IMG_5225Don’t even think about it mussels!

Alberta, British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Yukon Territory have joined forces to prevent and manage aquatic invasive species and have formalized this commitment by signing a joint agreement to keep these threats at bay.

The Inter-provincial-territorial Agreement for Coordinated Regional Defence Against Invasive Species is a step towards enhanced partnerships between jurisdictions on both prevention and response of invasive species in Western Canada.

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Caught in the act!

Looking out for our land – thank you!

Environment and Parks staff asked the public’s assistance in identifying two men who were photographed dumping refuse on public lands.

In less than 24 hours, we had an overwhelming response. The link was shared across several platforms, resulting in information being forwarded to our compliance investigation staff.

As a reminder, leaving refuse behind on public lands is problematic for the environment and it deprives other Albertans from enjoying and using that space responsibly. As a rule of thumb for our environment – when in doubt, leave only footprints and take only pictures.

As Albertans, we have an important role in keeping our province’s public lands healthy and beautiful. If you witness misuse anywhere, at any time, please call the Environmental Hotline at 800-222-6514. If we all work together, we can put a stop to this kind of disrespectful behaviour.