Celebrate our vast, complex, interconnected, beautiful environment

For the past 45 years, Canadians have marked the week of June 5 as Environment Week and taken the opportunity to talk about being green – but why do we do it?

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Our environment isn’t just the air we breathe and the water we drink, it’s the plankton that provide oxygen, it’s the bats that reduce pest species, and it’s the worms that make the soil more fertile. It’s a complex web of relationships between all the life with which we share the planet.

It’s sometimes hard to see the forest for the trees.

Because the environment is so vast and complex, every action we take can’t help but to affect the environment in some way, large or small. Every road we build separates one ecological niche from the next, every tree we plant might cast shade over a patch of grass, and every boat we paddle sends ripples across the lake.

Environment Week is an opportunity to think about the consequences of what we do, and to make good environmental choices.

If you’re wondering about how you can reduce your impact on the environment by conserving energy, visit www.efficiencyalberta.ca – you can even save money through rebate programs.

If you’re considering how you can reduce your water usage, visit http://aep.alberta.ca/water for information and for tips.

If you want to try composting at home to reduce the amount of household waste material that ends up in the landfill, we have information about that at http://aep.alberta.ca/waste/composting-at-home

All this week on our social media (AEP Twitter, and on Facebook at Respect The Land, My Wild Alberta and Alberta Parks), we’ll be posting environment-inspired materials. So follow us for fun facts, information and more as we celebrate our environment and celebrate making better choices for everyone!

Studying Cougars in Alberta – How to Collar a Cougar

This is part two of a three part series on cougar management work in Alberta.

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So now that you have met the people who are collaring cougars, we are going to take a look at how the work is done. Of course, offering this cougar a necklace just won’t fly – there is a purpose and method in this management work.
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Alberta’s Merry Migrators: A little birdie told me spring is here!

This is the final part of a four part series on migrators. You can find the first three parts on songbirdswater birds and bats and other birds here.

Trumpeter Swan

This installment of our series is about our migratory species’ coming home to Alberta – some of which have already made their way here! The sound of Canada geese honking has been resonating in the sky for a couple of weeks now (depending on where you live). Geese and other waterfowl try to time their return for when water bodies start becoming ice-free.   Continue reading

Going Wild for Wildlife Week!

Its-starting-owl twitterFor almost 70 years, the week of April 10 has been the week that Canadians are encouraged to celebrate our wild species, to enjoy our country’s natural heritage and to rededicate ourselves to conservation and sustainable management. Continue reading

New year, new fishing opportunities

2017 is a great year to get your family hooked on the Alberta fishing experience!

The 2017 Sportfishing Regulations come into force starting April 1 and with them come some new opportunities for recreational anglers in the province.

This decision was made based on several factors including data gathered from Fall Index Netting, information around fisheries management objectives and engagement with anglers and other interested members of the public. Continue reading

Alberta’s Merry Migrators: Bits and Bats

Ferruginous hawk

This is part three of a four part series on migrators. You can find the first two parts on songbirds and water birds here.

We’ve been learning about various kinds of birds that migrate south during Alberta’s long, cold winters. What about the birds of prey – owls, hawks, eagles and falcons? It turns out that some stay but many leave for southern clines. Continue reading

Alberta’s Merry Migrators: Water wings and hopes of spring

This is part two of a four part series on migrators. You can find the first part on songbirds here.

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There are still several weeks of winter left until we see one of the most iconic signs of spring – a group of Canada geese flying in a “V” formation. Alberta’s water birds are spending the winter in warmer southern climates.

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Studying Cougars in Alberta – Meet the Team

This is part one of a three part series on cougar management work in Alberta.

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How many Environment and Parks staff does it take to collar a cougar?

It’s actually a valid question. It turns out it takes several teams of highly trained professionals. This winter, two teams of wildlife biologists are collaring cougars to help gather data on population dynamics and movement patterns. The results will help inform future cougar management practices in Alberta.

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Alberta’s 5 Most Romantic Animals of 2017

When we think of Alberta’s wildlife we don’t always think about the birds and the bees. Valentine’s Day is the perfect time for some added romance. Here are our picks for this year’s five most loving, though not always the most lovable creatures.

1) Ord’s Kangaroo Rat

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Looking for love and romance!

You may be thinking, ‘What self-respecting Valentine looks for a rat?’, never fear: these unique creatures aren’t rats at all!

The Ord’s kangaroo rat can be found in southern Alberta, not far from Medicine Hat in the Suffield area. Their population is in extreme threat, with less than 400 left in the province. They live in sandy areas where roads, crops and climate change have drastically reduced their habitat.

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Alberta’s Merry Migrators: Winter is not always for the songbirds!

This is part one of a four part series on migrators.

When winter arrives, animals have only a few choices: migrate to a warmer place, hibernate, or cope with the conditions. Last year’s blog series featured different types of hibernators. This year we are going to profile some species that head south and explain why the change in locale is necessary for survival.

Black throated green warbler

Black-throated green warbler

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