Alberta Fisheries Management – Fishery Productivity

How many fish can be sustainably harvested from an Alberta lake? To answer that question, you need a basic understanding of biological economics. Let’s start by asking some straightforward questions:

  • How many fish are in a lake?
  • How many fish do you want to be there?
  • What is the annual interest rate (the surplus population growth rate)?
  • How necessary or important is reinvestment of fish back to the population?

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Fish Alberta – Wolf Lake

Wolves call the boreal forest around Wolf Lake home. The name and the surrounding area are evocative of the unspoiled nature, mature forest and striking scenery that visitors will find there.

The lake is popular for its simple, quiet and well-maintained campground, as well as other popular activities like berry picking, boating, swimming and water sports. The lake is slightly off the beaten path, and the only development on its shoreline is the campground and access road that were built in 1963. Continue reading

Alberta Fisheries Management – The Science of Fish

DSC05408Anglers in Alberta experience world-class fishing today, but this was not always the case.

Starting as early as the 1970s, Alberta’s sport fisheries declined to a shocking degree. Native trout like cutthroat trout and bull trout were rare catches in mountain streams. Lakes once famous for walleye and pike fishing were reduced to shadows of former quality. By the 1980s and 1990s, Alberta walleye fisheries were among the worst in North America; surveys at many lakes reporting 80 per cent of anglers catching nothing during a fishing trip. Angler numbers declined and with them went millions of dollars in lost economic activity. Continue reading

Alberta Fisheries Management – A Fishin’ Poll for Your Fishin’ Hole

The management of fisheries in Alberta is dynamic and challenging. Especially when considering that Alberta has experienced robust economic and population growth and has only 800 native sport fish-bearing lakes and about 300 waters stocked with non-native trout. In comparison, other provinces such as Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Ontario have tens, or even hundreds of thousands of fish-bearing lakes.

In addition to meeting the rights of Indigenous peoples, Alberta’s fisheries are also relied upon to provide benefits to more than 300,000 anglers. Fisheries management in Alberta has had to evolve and improve to meet the challenges.  Continue reading

Managing Grizzlies in Alberta

bigstockphoto_Here_I_Come grizzlySince 2010, Alberta has managed grizzly bears as a Threatened species. The objective is to increase the number of grizzlies on the landscape while reducing risks to people.  Efforts focus on measuring and monitoring grizzly bear population health and managing and mitigating human-bear conflicts.

Recent population inventories completed in southwest and west central Alberta show population growth. Preliminary results from Bear Management Area 5 also indicate population increase.  While this is a good thing, it makes keeping people and bears safe more challenging because it increases the likelihood of human-bear encounters. Continue reading

Fish Alberta – Wabamun Lake

‘Wabamun’ is the Cree word for mirror – It’s an apt name for the large, shallow, calm lake situated 60 kilometers west of Edmonton.

For generations, people living in Alberta have enjoyed Wabamun Lake’s natural beaches, beautiful wilderness and recreational opportunities.

For generations, Albertans have enjoyed swimming, sailing and fishing at Wabamun Lake

The area has three sailing clubs, multiple boat launches, and a provincial park. Surrounded by small communities such as Seba Beach, Rich’s Point, and Ascot Beach, Wabamun Lake attracts people for opportunities to go boating, sailing, swimming, wakeboarding and water skiing. Continue reading

Celebrate our vast, complex, interconnected, beautiful environment

For the past 45 years, Canadians have marked the week of June 5 as Environment Week and taken the opportunity to talk about being green – but why do we do it?

shutterstock_144849835BanffAlberta

Our environment isn’t just the air we breathe and the water we drink, it’s the plankton that provide oxygen, it’s the bats that reduce pest species, and it’s the worms that make the soil more fertile. It’s a complex web of relationships between all the life with which we share the planet Continue reading

Studying Cougars in Alberta – How to Collar a Cougar

This is part two of a three part series on cougar management work in Alberta.

Mtn Lion_2017

So now that you have met the people who are collaring cougars, we are going to take a look at how the work is done. Of course, offering this cougar a necklace just won’t fly – there is a purpose and method in this management work.
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Alberta’s Merry Migrators: A little birdie told me spring is here!

This is the final part of a four part series on migrators. You can find the first three parts on songbirdswater birds and bats and other birds here.

Trumpeter Swan

This installment of our series is about our migratory species’ coming home to Alberta – some of which have already made their way here! The sound of Canada geese honking has been resonating in the sky for a couple of weeks now (depending on where you live). Geese and other waterfowl try to time their return for when water bodies start becoming ice-free.   Continue reading

Going Wild for Wildlife Week!

Its-starting-owl twitterFor almost 70 years, the week of April 10 has been the week that Canadians are encouraged to celebrate our wild species, to enjoy our country’s natural heritage and to rededicate ourselves to conservation and sustainable management. Continue reading