Advancing knowledge through citizen science

Citizen science is an expanding field referring to public involvement in scientific research or monitoring with professional scientists. The public involvement may include anything from aiding in  data collection, to all aspects of a project (co-created) – from project design analysis and sharing of results. Citizen involvement in the scientific process is beneficial because it can increase scientific understanding, allow people to contribute to research on topics that interest them, create trusted results, fill data gaps and address local information needs and environmental concerns.

Albertans are helping advance this field of practice in our province. Through involvement in air and water monitoring initiatives to biodiversity programs looking at invasive species, pronghorns and bees, Albertans are supporting efforts in monitoring the environment and building resilient ecosystems.

Alberta Environment and Parks and the Miistakis Institute recently co-hosted a workshop titled: ‘Advancing Citizen Science in Alberta: Changing Perspectives, Breaking Barriers.’ The event explored best practices in the field of citizen science and identified priority actions to advance the field in Alberta. It also provided an opportunity for knowledge exchange and co-learning between citizen science experts, practitioners, resource managers and community members.

Alberta Environment and Parks’ Chief Scientist Dr. Fred Wrona remarked, “citizen

Fred and Panel 1

Dr. Lea Shanley (South Big Data Innovation Hub), Chief Scientist Dr. Fred Wrona (Alberta Environment & Parks), Jade Lauren Cawthray-Syms (University of Dundee), and Dr. Jennifer Shirk (Citizen Science Association).

science offers a unique approach to advance a generation of knowledge” and build public trust. A number of challenges and barriers need to be overcome, however, including perceptions around credibility and relevance of citizen science data and connecting this data with decision-makers.

“Be water on stone – wear it down or move around it” was one piece of advice shared by Lea Shanley, a passionate workshop panellist from South Big Data Innovation Hub. The workshop focused on overcoming barriers and growing the field of citizen science in Alberta.

Limitations to citizen science need to be considered and understood to ensure programs generate credible data and information. While more work is required to understand the role and utility of citizen science in Alberta, the workshop highlighted that engaged and trained citizen scientists can make meaningful contributions to science and monitoring programs by following recognized monitoring protocols and accredited data standards.

What’s next?

Working with the Miistakis Institute, Alberta Environment and Parks is developing principles and strategies to guide good practice and appropriate application of citizen science as part of the provincial environmental monitoring and science program.

_TJH2853

Working session on citizen science in Alberta.

Learn more

The everyday adventures of a parks interpreter

Story by Scott Sunderwald – Alberta Parks Interpreter

20170708_185052I often say that being an interpreter for Alberta Parks is more of a calling than a job. It takes many years of dedicated seasonal work to prove your salt, and, even then, only a few people are lucky enough to build a full-time career from interpretation.  I try to remember that every day and count my blessings. Continue reading

Rules for safe, responsible hunting

This blog series is targeted towards first time hunters and focuses on safe and sustainable hunting in Alberta. Check out a list of all the topics in the series here. This is the fourth article in the series.

It’s extremely important to follow safe practices and procedures while hunting. While on a hunt, conditions can change rapidly and good safety practices can mean the difference between life and death. Make sure you’re prepared and have educated yourself before heading out.

Firearm safety

The federal Firearms Act governs the use of firearms in Canada. Individuals wishing to acquire non-restricted firearms must take the Canadian Firearms Safety Course (CFSC) and pass the tests, or challenge and pass the CFSC tests. All hunters should be aware of federal laws surrounding the acquisition, possession, transportation and use of weapons and ammunition. Visit the Canadian Firearms Centre to learn more. Practice shooting and using a firearm will help you become both a more accurate and safe hunter. Continue reading

I Can’t Believe I Get Paid To Do This

Story by Brian Orr – Interpretation and Outreach Programmer at Miquelon Lake Provincial Park

Imagine having one of those jobs where you say to yourself: I can’t believe I get paid to do this.

Well, I don’t have to imagine, for me it’s a reality. Besides having a provincial park as my backyard, being a park interpreter is the best job I could ever hope for. Every morning as I get ready for the day, I become more and more excited. Today, I’m leading two separate environmental education programs – one on invertebrates (insects, spiders and such) and another on wetland ecology.

Continue reading